The UQ School of Psychology summer research projects and supervisors are listed below. Once you have found a project you are interested in you can apply via the UQ Student Employability Centre website.

Projects


How do we juggle multiple goals?

Supervisor: Dr Timothy Ballard

Project: We seek to examine how people make decisions while juggling competing goals. For example, how do pilots and air traffic controllers meet the demand to be on time while maintaining safety? How do medical practitioners balance the need for effective treatment while minimising the risk of side effects to the patient? We will use laboratory experiments to investigate the psychological processes that underlie these types of decisions. Our research is particularly interested in understanding the influence of factors such as how the goals are framed, the level of uncertainty in the environment, how difficult the goals are to achieve, and time deadlines on which goal people decide to prioritise and how long it takes to make the prioritisation decision. The scholar's duties will include reviewing relevant literature, running experiments and analysing data.

Duration: We are looking for a UQ student to work 10 weeks on the project.

Contact: t.ballard@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3346 9506

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Supporting families involved in the Community Corrections System: The role of parenting interventions

Supervisor: Dr Kylie Burke

Project: Children whose parents are involved in the Criminal Justice System are exposed to multiple family risk factors, which can negatively affect their development. This study is testing the feasibility of engaging offending parents in an evidence-based parenting intervention (Group Triple P) that is offered within the community corrections context (Probation and Parole). The summer scholar’s tasks may include: assisting with telephoning offending parents, scoring questionnaires, data entry, data cleaning, literature searches, and there may be opportunities to observe the group sessions depending on the group dates.

Duration: 8-10 weeks, to be negotiated with supervisor.

Contact: k.burke1@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 7306

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Fear-less Triple P: An intervention for parents of anxiety-disordered children

Supervisor: Dr Vanessa Cobham

Project: This trial is comparing two different ways of delivering the Fear-less Triple P intervention to parents of anxiety-disordered children aged 7-12 years. Families will be randomly assigned to either the 6-session group condition or the 1/2 day workshop condition. Families participate in a pre-assessment process involving diagnostic interviews with both parents and children, as well as completion of questionnaire measures. Following completion of the intervention, families are re-assessed at post-treatment, 6- and 12-month follow-up. The summer scholar will participate in a variety of tasks, including: scoring of questionnaires, data entry, telephone diagnostic interviews, viewing diagnostic interviews for inter-rater reliability and therapy sessions for treatment adherence, with possible opportunities to observe therapy sessions and diagnostic interviews (depending on where the team is in the recruitment/treatment cycle).

Duration: 8 weeks, over 2 4-week periods (mid-November to mid-December, then mid-January to mid-February).

Contact: vanessa@psy.uq.edu.au, +61 7 3346 9911

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Protective functions of parent-adolescent relationships on youth mental health outcomes

Supervisor: Dr Cassandra Dittman

Project: The primary focus of the summer research project will be on a study evaluating the role of the parent-adolescent relationship in the development of adolescent mental health problems (i.e.: anxiety and conduct disorders). This will be conducted through multi-method assessment, involving observational assessment of parent-adolescent relationships and questionnaire measures. The study will also evaluate the effectiveness of a brief parenting intervention for promoting supportive parenting and improved parent-adolescent relationships and how this may impact adolescent behaviour and functioning. Participants will be adolescents aged 11 to 17 years and their parents. The summer scholar will also be involved in supporting other research projects relating to the parenting of adolescents. The summer scholar will develop knowledge and skills in quantitative research about parenting, including: literature reviews; data collection and engaging and tracking participants; coding of observational data (appropriate training and a detailed coding manual will be provided as a guide); data entry, cleaning and preparation; and descriptive data analysis. The role is suitable for a third-year or Honours student with knowledge or interest in research on parenting or clinical psychology, knowledge of quantitative research methodology and data analysis skills and familiarity with SPSS (i.e.: through completion of PSYC3010). Please feel free to contact me before applying if you wish to clarify my expectations of the summer scholar's role in the project.

Duration: Three days per week for 8 weeks (negotiable) over 2 blocks: mid-November to mid-December, then mid-January to mid-February.

Contact: c.dittman@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 7303

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On the role of prefrontal cortex in stimulus-response learning

Supervisor: Associate Professor Paul E. Dux

Project: A/Prof Dux conducts research on the cognitive neuroscience of learning and performance enhancement via training and brain stimulation. The summer scholar will be involved in a study that will employ transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to test if the left prefrontal cortex is involved in early learning of stimulus response pairings. In addition, the study will test if different intensities of tDCS lead to different patterns of results. Undergraduate studies in psychology, neuroscience or a related field are required for this project.

Duration: 8 weeks, over 2 4-week periods (mid-November to mid–December, then mid-January to mid-February).

Contact: p.dux@psy.uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6885

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Qualitative evaluation of a substance use day program

Supervisor: Professor Leanne Hides (co-supervisor: Dr Catherine Quinn)

Project: This project will involve a qualitative evaluation of a new day program being delivered by Lives Lived Well, a leading Queensland-based not-for-profit organisation for people with alcohol and drug problems and associated mental health concerns. Key tasks will including assisting with the development of a qualitative interview protocol, conducting qualitative interviews with Lives Lived Well staff and day program participants, and then assisting in the analysis of the qualitative data and writing of a report of key findings. Applicants must have a Psychology background, strong interpersonal skills, confidence in speaking to others in person and over-the-phone, an ability to work independently and problem solve. Prior experience working with qualitative data is also desirable. Please feel free to contact Catherine or Leanne if you would like to clarify any aspects of the project before applying.

Duration: 8-10 weeks, starting November 20 with the potential for a break between mid-December and mid-January, with the project concluding mid-February.

Contact: l.hides@uq.edu.au, catherine.quinn@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3138 6144

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Effectively evaluating substance use treatment

Supervisor: Professor Leanne Hides (co-supervisor: Dr Catherine Quinn)

Project: This project will involve assessing and creating a database of validated outcome measures to evaluate the impact of substance use treatment programs among individuals and their families. Key tasks will include conducting systematic literature reviews, assessing the relative benefits of different outcomes measured, creating a database of surveys in Qualtrics, and writing a report justifying the selection of the different measures. Depending on opportunity, the successful applicant could also be involved in the administration of some of the surveys, and the entry and analysis of resulting data. Applicants must have a Psychology background, strong interpersonal skills, confidence in speaking to others in person and over-the-phone, an ability to work independently and problem solve. Prior experience working with qualitative data is also desirable. Please feel free to contact Catherine or Leanne if you would like to clarify any aspects of the project before applying.

Duration: 8-10 weeks, starting November 20 with the potential for a break between mid-December and mid-January, with the project concluding mid-February.

Contact: l.hides@uq.edu.au, catherine.quinn@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3138 6144

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Evaluating an automated online hazard perception training course for drivers

Supervisor: Associate Professor Mark Horswill

Project: We developed an automated online hazard perception training course for drivers, packed to the brim with exciting innovations. Pilot data indicates that it may have a huge beneficial effect on drivers' hazard perception response times – bigger than any effect I’ve yet seen in this field. We now need to formally evaluate its effects in a series of experiments. If it works then I’m hoping it will revolutionise driver training. The summer scholar's activities on the project will include conducting usability analyses of the training course, testing participants, and video coding. They will learn a range of research skills, gain the opportunity for a reference from A/Prof Horswill, and potentially have input into research that may save thousands of lives.

Duration: 8-10 weeks, to be negotiated with supervisor.

Contact: m.horswill@psy.uq.edu.au, +61 7 3346 9520

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How do children of diverse backgrounds learn about the world?

Supervisor: Dr Kana Imuta

Project: Recent research suggests that children of diverse backgrounds (e.g., bilinguals, biracials, etc) perceive the world differently to those from homogeneous backgrounds. In this project, you will be assisting with hands-on research with young children that investigates how exposure to multiple social groups affects children’s social-cognitive development. Students will gain hands-on experience with research on child development.

Duration: 6 to 8 weeks. Applicants should hold a blue card by the commencement of the project. Note: the blue card application process takes up to 6 weeks.

Contact: k.imuta@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6805

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Me and Mine: self-reference behaviours in interactions with property

Supervisor: Dr Ada Kritikos

Project: In this project we want to investigate how the concept of the ‘self’ determines our interactions with other people, and with property. To do this, we will use response times measures as well as motion capture technology to record how people interact with their own and with other people’s objects. We will train you in motion capture data collection and analysis, and introduce you to experimental stimulus presentation software (Eprime). This project is ideal for students wishing to pursue studies in Cognitive (Neuro)science. Preference will be given to students who have done PSYC2020 and / or PSYC3302. Please feel free to contact me before applying if you wish to clarify my expectations of the summer scholar's role in the project.

Duration: 8 weeks from early December (dates negotiable).

Contact: a.kritikos@psy.uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6408

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Does selective attention alter orientation tuning in visual brain areas?

Supervisor: Professor Jason Mattingley (co-supervisor: Dr Matthew Tang)

Project: Mechanisms of selective attention play an important role in regulating neural responses to sensory stimuli. This project will combine behavioural testing and electroencephalography (EEG) in healthy human volunteers to determine whether spatial attention influences orientation tuning in visual areas of the brain. The scholar can expect to learn about human behavioural testing, data analysis, and the use of EEG to understand brain function. It is expected that the scholar will give a presentation on his or her work in a laboratory meeting, and that the results will eventually be suitable for publication. This project is open to applications from UQ enrolled scholars with a background in experimental psychology or human cognitive neuroscience. Preference will be given to applicants in later stages of their degree (e.g., 3rd year, Honours) who already have some experience with behavioural testing and/or EEG. For further information about the project, please contact Prof Mattingley at the Queensland Brain Institute. Please note: if applying for Prof Mattingley's projects you must select the Queensland Brain Institute as the research unit in your application.

Duration: 8 - 10 weeks.

Contact: j.mattingley@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3346 7935

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How is visual information integrated to make simple perceptual decisions?

Supervisor: Professor Jason Mattingley (co-supervisor: Dr Dragan Rangelov)

Project: Virtually all aspects of daily life require us to make decisions, but it is not clear how the brain takes information from sensory stimuli in the environment and uses this to select appropriate responses. This project will combine behavioural testing and electroencephalography (EEG) in healthy human volunteers to determine how the brain integrates discrete visual motion signals to decide on their average direction. The scholar can expect to learn about human behavioural testing, data analysis and the use of EEG to understand brain function. It is expected that the scholar will give a presentation on his or her work in a laboratory meeting, and that the results will eventually be suitable for publication. This project is open to applications from UQ enrolled scholars with a background in experimental psychology or human cognitive neuroscience. Preference will be given to applicants in later stages of their degree (e.g., 3rd year, Honours) who already have some experience with behavioural testing and/or EEG. This project is supervised by Prof Jason Mattingley and Dr Dragan Rangelov. For further information about the project, please contact Prof Mattingley at the Queensland Brain Institute. Please note: if applying for Prof Mattingley's projects you must select the Queensland Brain Institute as the research unit in your application.

Duration: 8 - 10 weeks.

Contact: j.mattingley@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3346 7935

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Can visual attention tell us how children integrate expression cues?

Supervisor: Dr Nicole Nelson

Project: This is an eye-tracking project looking at how children and adults look at and integrate emotional stimuli. Anticipated tasks will involve data entry, literature searches, creation of stimuli, and data collection with adults and children. Students will gain experience working with children, and with eye-tracking equipment. Applicants must have a blue card and experience working with children.

Duration: 10 weeks (late November through January).

Contact: n.nelson@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6427

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Children's moral perceptions of robots

Supervisor: Associate Professor Mark Nielsen

Project: This project explores how children perceive the moral worth of robots. While robots are becoming more frequent social partners in our everyday lives, very little is known about how we think about them. Preliminary evidence shows that children consider robots as having characteristics similar to humans and animals. Despite this, in many cases, children bully robots. Little is known about this why this occurs, or the factors that could reduce this bullying behaviour. This project aims to understand children’s moral concern for robots, and how anthropomorphism influences these perceptions. Students will be involved in a variety of research-related tasks associated with seeking to answer this question. This will primarily involve data collection, but may also involve coding of data, data analysis, contributing to preparing a manuscript and conducting a literature review. Applicants should hold a blue card by the commencement of the project.

Duration: 10 weeks.

Contact: nielsen@psy.uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6414

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Do children overimitate robots?

Supervisor: Associate Professor Mark Nielsen

Project: This project explores whether children will overimitate robotic agents. Research has documented that children readily engage in overimitation (the reproduction of causally irrelevant elements within a bigger action sequence). Previous research on overimitation has focused exclusively on human overimitation, however it is currently unknown whether children will overimitate a robotic agent. Students will be involved in a variety of research-related tasks associated with seeking to answer this question. This will primarily involve data collection, but may also involve coding of data, data analysis, contributing to preparing a manuscript and conducting a literature review. Applicants should hold a blue card by the commencement of the project.

Duration: 10 weeks.

Contact: nielsen@psy.uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6414

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Global Change Ambassadors

Supervisor: Professor Nancy A. Pachana

Project: Together with the UQ Global Change Institute, we have a grant to pilot training older adults to be sustainability ambassadors in their community. We are working with community groups such as COTA (Council on the Ageing), National Seniors, and industry partners to design an innovative program of leadership, environmental communication and sustainability knowledge aimed at older peer-to-peer leaders. We are looking to put in several papers and a grant application and need literature reviews and work on examining feasibility. There will be an opportunity to interact with community organisations and meet international research partners. Previous experience working with community/industry groups is desirable.

Duration: 10 weeks, with a flexible start date.

Contact: npachana@psy.uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6832

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Models of transitional care

Supervisor: Professor Nancy A. Pachana

Project: Older adults who experience physical or psychiatric disorders later in life can still function within the community with appropriate support. Transitional Care interventions focus on improving care and enhancing patient and family carer outcomes, as well as offering reducing costs and better outcomes in health systems and community care contexts. We are looking to put in several papers and a grant application and need literature reviews on such models or care for older persons. An opportunity to interact with community organisations and visit model care settings will be available. Previous experience working in or with aged care organisations is desirable.

Duration: 10 weeks, with a flexible start date.

Contact: npachana@psy.uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6832

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Engineering an organic computer with multiple interconnected human brains

Supervisor: Dr David Painter

Project: Traditional neuroscience experiments (1) examine the brain activity of individuals in isolation from others and (2) treat individuals as observers rather than active participants. Here we overcome these limitations by connecting brains with each other and machines using electroencephalography (EEG) to create multi-person brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). We follow in the footsteps of Professor Miguel Nicolelis’ Duke University group who recently showed that networks comprised of multiple animal brains, exchanging information in real time through BCIs, creates a new type of computer: the organic computer or “Brainet”. We will attempt to replicate and extend their findings to human Brainets of up to eight simultaneously connected individuals. Successful applicants for the summer program will learn to create BCIs. There are no specific prerequisites for these positions, but previous experience with EEG and/or computer programming (e.g., MATLAB) is an advantage. An interest in cognitive neuroscience, engineering or computer science is essential.

Duration: 10 weeks, starting in December (dates negotiable).

Contact: d.painter1@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6229

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Are there hidden costs to performance-based pay?

Supervisor: Dr Stacey Parker

Project: Considerable resources are invested in employee reward and compensation programs; however, although such programs can improve performance, there are hidden costs to motivation, and the consequences for well-being remain unknown. This research examines the stress involved in striving for performance-based extrinsic rewards. It includes experiments and field studies where the subjective and physiological experience of stress is examined while in pursuit of these types of rewards. We aim to shed light on how employees perceive extrinsic rewards and what they experience when in pursuit of these. You will be involved in 1) preparing and pilot testing experimental studies on this topic, and 2) assisting the team in conducting a field-based survey study on this topic. Tasks include development of surveys and other experimental materials, data collection, data cleaning and coding, some preliminary data analysis, and some literature search and synthesis. A keen interest in organisational psychology is desirable. Completion of the relevant third year statistics and research methods courses is also desirable, but not essential.

Duration: 10 weeks. The project will run from mid-November to mid-December, then recommence in mid-January ending mid-February.

Contact: s.parker@psy.uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6423

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Is task variety the spice of work?

Supervisor: Dr Stacey Parker

Project: Theories of work stress and work motivation posit that having variety in your work tasks improves your motivation and well-being. This is because having a range of different tasks to do can be more interesting and mean work is less monotonous. However, research from cognitive psychology demonstrates that switching tasks can impair your overall performance (because it's hard to remember what you were doing/where you were up to). Thus, this research project will take a closer look at the benefits and consequences of switching between different kinds of work tasks (i.e., fun vs boring). We hope to answer the questions: 1) is variety the spice of work? And 2) does it matter which types of work tasks you do first (i.e., the fun or boring task)? The project will include experiments and experience sampling field studies where participants' subjective and physiological responses to task variety and task switching are examined. We aim to shed light on how work should be organised to maximise motivation, well-being, and performance. You will be involved in 1) preparing and pilot testing experimental studies on this topic, and 2) assisting the team in conducting a field-based experience sampling study on this topic. Tasks include literature review, development of surveys and other experimental materials, data collection, data cleaning and coding, and some preliminary data analysis. A keen interest in organisational psychology is desirable. Completion of the relevant third year statistics and research methods courses is also desirable, but not essential.

Duration: 10 weeks. The project will run from mid-November to mid-December, then recommence in mid-January ending mid-February.

Contact: s.parker@psy.uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6423

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Understanding when and why people cooperate

Supervisor: Dr Kim Peters

Project: Students will contribute to the Global Cooperation Databank Project (led by Daniel Balliet and the Amsterdam Cooperation Lab) which is building a databank summarising the entire 70-year history of experimental research on cooperation. Students will join the international group of researchers who are contributing to this project by reading papers and coding the characteristics of each study and its findings. Students will work with Kim Peters and the Amsterdam Cooperation Lab, who will provide training. Students working on the project will gain a good understanding of findings and methodologies in cooperation and social dilemmas and learn how contemporary practices in psychology can help to advance science. Importantly, this project is an excellent opportunity for a student to join a team of leading international researchers in building a database that will make a big contribution to social science. Students will be tasked with coding a set of research papers. The student will be supervised by Kim Peters, but will also have meetings with Daniel Balliet and other members of the Amsterdam Cooperation Lab. A background in psychology is essential; a background in economics is desirable (but not essential).

Duration: 10 weeks (at 20 hours per week). The start and end dates are flexible, and students will have complete autonomy over their weekly work schedule.

Contact: k.peters@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3346 9157

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Theory-of-mind and the understanding of future uncertainty in preschool children

Supervisor: Dr Jonathan Redshaw

Project: During the preschool years, children begin to understand that they and other people can hold false beliefs about current reality. Around the same time, children become able to prepare for multiple possible versions of a single uncertain future event. In theory, these abilities may be linked, because to prepare for two versions of the future you might have to understand that your initial prediction of a future event could be false. In this project, you will assist in study development and collect data on the relationship between theory-of-mind and the understanding of future uncertainty in 3-year-old children. This will involve testing children for approximately 30 minutes on a number of tasks in the Early Cognitive Development Centre at UQ. You will receive hands-on training prior to testing and will be invited to be a co-author on any resulting publications. Note: Applicants should hold a current Blue Card at the time of project commencement. Blue Card applications take approximately 6-8 weeks to be approved.

Duration: 8-10 weeks beginning late November, with a break over the end-of-year holidays.

Contact: j.redshaw@uq.edu.au

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Modeling selection costs in speeded decision-making

Supervisor: Dr David Sewell

Project: When making decisions, there is a tradeoff between the speed with which choices are made and the accuracy of those choices. Traditionally, differences in performance under speed and accuracy emphasis have been understood in terms of differences in the decision thresholds people set. When accuracy is emphasised, people are more cautious in their responding and require more evidence before committing to a choice. When speed is emphasised, people require relatively less evidence before making a choice, which can lead to an increase in errors. Recently, it has been shown that, under speed emphasis, people sometimes rely on qualitatively different sources of information to make simple perceptual decisions. The goal of the current project is to investigate the effects of speed emphasis on higher-order judgments with multi-attribute stimuli (e.g., categorisation decisions). The findings from this project will inform discussion about cognitive strategies people may utilise to simplify decision-making processes (e.g., the use of simple rules or heuristics), and how these relate to rational decision strategies. Students working on this project will gain experience designing and running cognitive experiments. Students will also have an opportunity to apply cognitive models of the decision-making process to data, and learn how to interpret the results of model fits. There are no formal requirements for this project. Experience or familiarity with a programming language (e.g., Matlab) would be helpful, but is by no means essential.

Duration: 10 weeks (November 27 – February 16, though there is some flexibility around start and finish dates).

Contact: d.sewell@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3346 7629

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Health and well-being in organisations: What makes people healthy and engaged at work?

Supervisor: Dr Nik Steffens

Project: One of the core questions of psychology has centred on identifying the factors that allow individuals to perform well and be productive. However, beyond performance and productivity, initial evidence indicates that it is as (if not more) important that organisations look after their employees by promoting their health and well-being. Yet, we are only starting to uncover the range of factors that promote health and well-being in organisations and we know little about their relative impact (i.e., how strongly different factors impact on health and engagement). In the present project we are conducting research to gain a better understanding of (a) the factors that influence people’s health and well-being in organisations, as well as (b) the variability in the extent to which these impact people’s health and engagement. As a summer scholar, you can gain research experience and contribute to the development of this research by assisting in (a) developing the study design, as well as (b) collecting and coding of data (depending on your skills and interests you may also engage in additional tasks such as data analysis), and (c) preparing a short scientific report.

Duration: 10 weeks.

Contact: n.steffens@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3346 9555

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Making science better: What factors influence people's beliefs about the usefulness of scientific replications?

Supervisor: Dr Nik Steffens (co-supervisor: Dr Kim Peters)

Project: Science and scientific progress rest in replicable findings. However, large-scale analyses indicate that a significant proportion of published scientific findings are false (e.g., by claiming to show an effect that in fact is not true; Ioannidis, 2005) while recent large-scale replication projects have shown that many scientific findings do not replicate (OSF, 2015). This has sparked a heated debate in psychology and other scientific disciplines about the truthfulness of particular original studies, replication studies, as well as large-scale registered replication reports (RRRs; which involve pre-registered, multiple identical, independent replications to better understand psychological phenomena). However, what do people believe how useful replications and RRRs are? And why? In the present projects we are conducting research that aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of (a) researchers’ beliefs about the evidential value of replications and RRRs and (b) the factors that shape these beliefs. As a summer scholar, you can gain research experience and contribute to the development of this research by assisting in (a) developing the study design, as well as (b) collecting and coding of data (depending on your skills and interests you may also engage in additional tasks such as data analysis), and (c) preparing a short scientific report.

Duration: 10 weeks.

Contact:n.steffens@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3346 9555

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Transdiagnostic risk factors for obsessive-compulsive disorder and body dysmorphic disorder

Supervisor: Dr Cynthia Turner

Project: The summer scholar will work on two projects during the internship period. One project will be looking at attention processes in body dysmorphic disorder. The scholar will work with the project investigators to set up the materials needed to run this project (an online survey, computer-based experimental tasks, photographic materials), and will be involved in pilot testing the experiments that will be run. The second project is looking at data relating to transdiagnostic risk factors for obsessive-compulsive disorder and body dysmorphic disorder in young people. Tasks related to this project will include some literature searches, data screening a large data set, preliminary statistical analyses, and assistance with preparing a manuscript for submission if the scholar would be interested in this. Applicants with experience in completing data screening and cleaning, and undertaking literature reviews, are preferred.

Duration: 10 weeks, although this time period could be shortened if the candidate undertaking the scholarship has other commitments that conflict with this. UQ will be closed in the week between Christmas and New Year, and there will also be two weeks during this summer period when the supervisor will be on leave; as such, the project can run in two blocks if preferred.

Contact: cynthia.turner@uq.edu.au

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Anonymity on the internet

Supervisor: Dr Eric Vanman

Project: This project is investigating how often and why people sometimes need to be “anonymous” on the Internet. Some of this project time will be devoted to developing an existing library of useful references in this area. We will also conduct a study using online research participation pools (e.g., MTurk and Prolific). Students will meet regularly with Dr Vanman throughout the project. We will set weekly goals for both the library reference work and the online project. Our overall goal will be to have both completed by the end of the summer. The student may share authorship on anything that is published from this work. Excellent library and reference skills are required. You should have completed PSYC1020, 1030, and 1040 prior to applying. You should also have a strong interest in social media platforms, and perhaps personal experience that may be relevant as we brainstorm the online study.

Duration: 7 weeks (Part 1: 20 November – 15 December; Part 2: 22 January – 10 February).

Contact: e.vanman@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6213

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The psychophysiology of empathy

Supervisor: Dr Eric Vanman

Project: This study will focus on the situational factors that cause us to have more or less empathy for another person. These factors might include the facial expression of the other person, their age or race, how trustworthy they appear, their "story", etc. The project will involve learning how to record facial EMG (muscle activity from the face) and possibly other physiological measures. Students will meet regularly with Dr Vanman throughout the project. We will set weekly goals for the project, which will cover learning the EMG methodology, data collection, and the analysis of the data. Our overall goal is to have the project completed by the end of the summer. The student may share authorship on anything that is published from this work. You should have completed PSYC1020, 1030, and 1040 prior to applying. Preference for this project will be given to students who are planning to enter the 4th Year of Honours in Psychology in 2018.

Duration: 7 weeks (Part 1: 20 November – 15 December; Part 2: 22 January – 10 February).

Contact: e.vanman@uq.edu.au, +61 7 3365 6213

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