Study

Are you ready to embark on the scientific study of how people behave, think and feel? Psychologists study everything about the human experience from the basic workings of the human brain to consciousness, memory, reasoning and language to personality and mental health. Psychology is one of the most popular courses within the faculty of health. We offer a range of ways to study psychology.

Undergraduate

At UQ, you have the opportunity to study Psychology in a number of ways:

More about undergraduate

 

Higher Degree by Research

The School of Psychology at UQ is the home of high quality research. If you would like to pursue a career in research or academia, you should consider Higher Degree by Research (HDR).

More about HDR

Postgraduate

You can undertake accredited psychology professional training in specialist areas:

If you are not seeking professional registration, you may be interested in:

For registered psychologists wishing to train in another specialist area:

 

More about postgraduate

Why choose us

The University of Queensland has one of the most prestigious Schools of Psychology in Australia. Its strong reputation is built on excellence in teaching, research, and service to the community.

The school is ranked 25th in the world in the 2017 QS World University Rankings by Subject.

All three of our undergraduate programs have approved sequences of study that are accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) and meet degree requirements for provisional registration as a psychologist with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA).

Our teaching team regularly receive teaching awards from various bodies, and we attract high-achieving undergraduates from across Australia and internationally.

Paige Ebersohn in the Northern TerritoryWhat our students say

"During my Psychology degree, I received a UQ Advantage Grant that allowed me to volunteer in a remote area of the Northern Territory. Many Indigenous communities have limited access to crucial services, especially for young people. Each day a teammate and I would organise and run craft, sport, cooking, and leisure activities. The experience contextualised my studies and illuminated the need to think critically, especially when faced with stereotypes of Indigenous Australians. I did an assignment on Indigenous child health for a public policy course and become very interested and passionate about Indigenous Australians and the issues associated with policy throughout history. I feel that being in a community put a practical and very real perspective on the information I had researched." Paige

Talk to us

To find out more our programs, including application details, email contactus@psy.uq.edu.au.