Researcher biography

Associate Professor Matthew Gullo is a clinical psychologist and MRFF Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) Principal Research Fellow at the National Centre for Youth Substance Use Research, The University of Queensland. A true scientist-practitioner, he continues to provide treatment services as a Visiting Senior Clinical Psychologist at the Princess Alexandra Hospital's Alcohol and Drug Assessment Unit. In this role, he provides evidence-based psychological treatment for alcohol, stimulant, and cannabis use disorders as well as clinical supervision for psychologists-in-training. Associate Professor Gullo is a Member of the Australian Psychological Society (APS) and a Fellow of the APS College of Clinical Psychologists. He currently serves on the Executive Committee of the APS College of Clinical Psychologists (QLD).

Associate Professor Gullo's expertise is in addiction and substance use. He led the Psychosocial Interventions section of the 2020 Commonwealth Guidelines for the Treatment of Alcohol Problems. These guidelines provide up-to-date, evidence-based information to a broad range of health care professionals, including general practitioners, nurses, medical specialists, psychologists and counsellors. Associate Professor Gullo's research seeks to improve the assessment and treatment of substance use disorder through a better understanding of the complex biosocial cognitive mechanisms involved, revealing new targets for personalised intervention. These mechanisms include reward sensitivity, impulsivity, substance-related cognition (beliefs about drug effects, craving, drug refusal self-efficacy), and studying how they are affected by social influences and genetic predisposition. The scope of this research program covers the entire translational spectrum:

Associate Professor Gullo has authored over 85 peer-reviewed scientific publications and been awarded over $3.4m in research funding. His research has advanced targeted treatment efforts "on the ground". At Princess Alexandra Hospital, he led the implementation of several initiatives to improve practice, including the development of a new theoretically-driven, instant assessment and feedback system (iAx). These initiatives have improved the provision of care to over 6,000 patients through the translation of the latest research findings into frontline service delivery.

Associate Professor Gullo has received awards for his research from peak national health and scientific bodies, including the Australian Psychological Society (Early Career Award), Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs (Early Career Award), National Health and Medical Research Council (Early Career Fellowship), and Medical Research Future Fund (Translating Research into Practice Fellowship).